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Hacked III: Third Time's The Charm (M90 940 Edition) (prev. Hacked II)

On my Quantum TD I had to ez-out (the socket style ones that dig into the outer diameter of the bolt head) those crank pulley bolts because every single one got rounded out by me or from some previous mechanic. I bought nice new ones from Lowe's or something afterwards.

Honestly, the socket fit is pretty good, gets a nice bite - just hits the rad support which is what's causing the weirdness.
 
More Not-Progress

Alright, well... this is truly incredible.

So I have some motivation to work on the car again, and something of a game plan. First thing that I need to do is to re-tighten that center crank bolt so I can use it to turn the motor over (in neutral, of course)... this took a long time, as per it being a long, fine threaded bolt.

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Of course, it does eventually give me the leverage I need to spin the motor over just enough to be able to grab the last remaining hex screw. After this point, I stuck it back in 4th.

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I had a hard time getting the socket to fit in there... mostly because I'm too lazy to remove the front end of the car and I'm sort of just waving it around blindly, trying to find these bolts that are heavily sunken into the crank pulley - they're a good bit down in there... eventually I line it up and right away I have a problem.

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It looks like I've fully bottomed the hex end of the socket, but it's so incredibly loose fitting. Giving it a little force bends it to an angle I don't feel comfortable with.

I stick my camera down into the engine bay with the flash on and sure enough, it's gooched.

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Great. I'm glad. It's this kind of thing that makes me want to just put it all back together and time the pump - at least that way it'll run and I can either take it to someone who has the time and space to actually fix it or sell it and make the car someone else's problem.
 
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Huh, well uh... okay.

Ok, so this kinda just happened.

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I wasn't really sure what those hex screws were secured to, so I got to monkeying around with the pulley (after having removed the center bolt) and noticed how loose it was... it just kinda fell off - revealing another, smaller pulley bolted to the backside. That's what the screws were for.

Anyway...uh... I guess I partially solved my problem, then... way better access to get an extractor in there.

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Of course, the belt came off with it... so I'll be retiming the engine.

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An unusual double update today... yeesh.
 
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Has there been discussion about the crankbolt torque yet? Because I foresee that as another mountain you're going to have to scale once you've timed the engine and gotten the front of the motor back together.

iirc the spec'd tightening torque is north of 300 ft. lbs. At least it was on the 5 cylinder I worked on.
 
Has there been discussion about the crankbolt torque yet? Because I foresee that as another mountain you're going to have to scale once you've timed the engine and gotten the front of the motor back together.

iirc the spec'd tightening torque is north of 300 ft. lbs. At least it was on the 5 cylinder I worked on.

I've seen people on forums quote various figures, anywhere from 280 ft-lbs to 320... sometimes more. What I've gathered is that you want to get as close to 300 ft-lbs with the crank bolt wrench, and then finish up an extra few degrees with a breaker bar.
 
Awesome work Fatcat!

This is not factual information.

I'm procrastinating a bit about the stripped hex screw - it's probably not a big deal to just find a bolt with the right length and thread pitch, just going to annoy the hell out of me to not have it match the rest.

I thought about simply extracting it and saying "3 out of 4 ain't bad" but I'm confident that will lead to a lot of problems down the line.
 
This is not factual information.

I'm procrastinating a bit about the stripped hex screw - it's probably not a big deal to just find a bolt with the right length and thread pitch, just going to annoy the hell out of me to not have it match the rest.

I thought about simply extracting it and saying "3 out of 4 ain't bad" but I'm confident that will lead to a lot of problems down the line.

I don't think they're uncommon bolts; I bet it's M8x.125 which you can get in the hardware aisle at any Lowe's or Home Depot. Just replace all 4 with new ones, probably $5 in expense at the most.
 
the

Another sort-of-update?

I have to get this done before snow falls, otherwise I lose the microscopic amount of credibility I posess...

Most of the time between last update (which now lacks images, I guess I need to find a new way to host them) I spent procrastinating and whining about this car, rather than finding solutions to problems. My big 'issue' was finding the correct screws to replace the stripped one in the crank pulley, which I was unable to find locally at Home Depot or literally anywhere else that normally has fasteners.

I was then introduced to Fastenal, and I felt like a moron. They had them in pretty much the right size, albeit in a pack of 50... which I will certainly never use up. Only $20 though, so who cares, right?

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The next issue was getting out that one stripped bolt (which I then made worse by trying to force it and stick various-sized tools in there in an effort to get it to move). I ended up resorting to drilling, which is always fun to do with a hand drill and no table space.

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After this small triumph, I sat around for a day figuring out what to do next, though mostly dreading the 'spooky' timing procedures for the D24 - which at first glance seem like witchcraft.

My biggest fear was the confusion on how you hold everything still whilst torquing the crank pulley - in my previous experience removing it, the engine turned over several degrees before the holding tool was keeping it stationary, which is evidently enough margin to cause a valve-piston marriage.

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That's where this little doohickie comes in. There's a slot on the back of the cam, and there's more or less only one way for it to go on, and therefore it's pretty much impossible to screw up the timing if you follow the correct steps, which I'll get to in my next thread update (or so I hope).

With that, back to the garage!

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Here's another thing that was stressing me out - I'm apparently a weakling and it took me a good twenty minutes to loosen this cam bolt, trying to brace it with the holder tool with my even weaker left arm wasn't really working out. Turns out, I just needed to rethink the angles at which I was working and ignore my fear of snapping bolts.

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The ingenious thing (that I failed to comprehend before) about the cam gears on this motor is that you're meant to leave them loose at first so you can set belt tension and torque that crank pulley (very important!) without worrying about cam timing - then you can lock the cam in place, tighten it on and finish the job.

Such a huge load off my shoulders.

Anyway, with that off, I needed to also get the backside of the timing cover off to access the water pump (which acts as the front belt tensioner) for removal. naturally, I had to remove the alternator bracket to give me space, which was a little annoying. It's a little weird to see the front of the motor like this, just a flat monolithic block.

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Shiny new parts to go on my clapped out motor!

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Removing the water pump proved to be a bit of a bear, and probably an issue for future me (aka next time I go work on it).

This was an A/C (delete) car, so it has a slightly different P-S pump bracket than the non-A/C cars... which blocks one corner of the pump, with which it seems to share a bolt. I was able to shimmy the water pump out (losing some coolant, of course), but getting the new one back in without dislodging the gasket is pretty much impossible. Just another annoyance, but something that needs to be removed next time before I get the w-p back on.

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I was working off the greenbook, which uses a non-A/C car as an example (in which the power steering pump is placed much lower and out of the way), so my foresight was pretty clouded. Otherwise, I would've removed it sooner.

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I left it there for now. Last couple days I've been pretty busy with personal issues, and a minor eye infection was keeping me out of the garage today.

I'm thinking reassembly will go easily...and I really want to return the tools to v8volvo, considering he lent them to me in May, when I was still thinking this would take me a week at most... yeah, that went well. He's been coaching me on the wizardry of the D24 and has been a great help in my understanding of this rather weird and frustratingly obtuse engine.

Until next time, I guess.
 
Most of the time between last update (which now lacks images, I guess I need to find a new way to host them) I spent procrastinating and whining about this car, rather than finding solutions to problems.

Best I can recommend is imgur. Only weakness is that it'll make the photos gigantic but I believe theres a way to resize it by modifying the URL.

Good to see you're making progress though!
 
My biggest fear was the confusion on how you hold everything still whilst torquing the crank pulley - in my previous experience removing it, the engine turned over several degrees before the holding tool was keeping it stationary, which is evidently enough margin to cause a valve-piston marriage.

...

The ingenious thing (that I failed to comprehend before) about the cam gears on this motor is that you're meant to leave them loose at first so you can set belt tension and torque that crank pulley (very important!) without worrying about cam timing - then you can lock the cam in place, tighten it on and finish the job.

...

Anyway, with that off, I needed to also get the backside of the timing cover off to access the water pump (which acts as the front belt tensioner) for removal. naturally, I had to remove the alternator bracket to give me space, which was a little annoying. It's a little weird to see the front of the motor like this, just a flat monolithic block.

Yep, the rotation of the cam sprockets independent of the cam is a big key to how this process works. The fact that the belt tension is set using the water pump which sits on the *tension* (drive) side of the timing belt, not the slack side, means that anytime you adjust the belt tension by repositioning the WP, you also change cam timing, UNLESS you are careful to allow the cam pulley to rotate free of the cam and only lock it to the cam AFTER setting belt tension.

You can make small adjustments to the tension afterwards without it mattering too much in terms of cam timing, but you do want to get it very close beforehand.

One small correction to the above on the torquing of the crank pulley, just in case it was not clear before -- you do this AFTER the rest of the timing job, since it does inevitably require the crank to rotate some distance so that your crank locking tool 5187 can find something to rest against. So it goes in this sequence:

1 - get timing belt on the motor and wrapped around all the rotating parts
2 - install the big balancer and its big center bolt plus the four allen screws, and get all those fasteners reasonably tight as much as you can but WITHOUT significantly disturbing the crankshaft position
3 - do the rest of the final tensioning and cam timing steps, ending with the water pump in its (hopefully) final position and the cam sprocket torqued and locked to the cam on the taper fit
4 - now do the final torque of the crank center bolt, knowing that you have the engine timed in sequence and the crank is now free to rotate without jeopardizing your timing job.

It's definitely one of those things that seems bizarre until you have done it once, and then after you have been through it, you realize that it is all simple and actually very elegant. Other timing belt setups seem kind of crude and irritating after you have done a VW diesel and are used to them.

Make sure to get the front of the block surface good and clean and flat where the water pump installs, with no residue or rough spots, since you'll be moving that pump around a little bit while you are working with the belt tension, and don't want to tear up the O-ring as it drags across the mating surface.

And just in case I did not say this before, get rid of that 4 piece cork/rubber valve cover gasket! The 1-piece all rubber and steel updated style is the way to go.


and I really want to return the tools to v8volvo

As I said, don't worry about that, this is what those tools are for and nobody else is asking for them. Main thing is to see the car back together and running in whatever time it takes.
:)
 
Progress!

You are missed on the discord. The masses are pleased to see your progress. Applause and heckling await there.
 
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You are missed on the discord.

Perhaps I will rejoin if/once I get it running. At this point in the year, I find it unlikely that I will be driving this anytime soon, but the vehicle functioning as an automobile would go a long way to motivating me to fix everything else wrong with it, if not just outright selling it.

I'm doing my best not to look at other projects, but there's a pretty tasty looking 164E that's beckoning...
 
...man...I'm drowning in redblocks I'm not using...it's crazy :p ;).

Well, I won't say no to Amazon Prime Delivery of one or two or all of them.

I'd love to drive up there sometime to meet you myself and pilfer your stash... my (until now undisclosed) issue apart from lacking motivation is being unemployed, and having no income currently is making it hard to buy anything more than nickle and dime stuff and not feeling an immense pain in my wallet glands.

I'm working on that.
 
being unemployed,

Hey but doesn't that leave you all kinds of free time to get your nice D24 245 running? And then won't the resulting reliable 35mpg car be a good boost to finances in terms of saving money at the gas pump?

:)

I got some of my most ambitious and successful projects done in my unemployed/underemployed stretches of the last 10 years. My experience is that you can have either money or time, not both.... but having time and no money isn't really any worse than having money but no time, in terms of doing the things one wants to do. Or at least it's good to have it both ways here and there for stretches.
 
Well, I won't say no to Amazon Prime Delivery of one or two or all of them.

I'd love to drive up there sometime to meet you myself and pilfer your stash... my (until now undisclosed) issue apart from lacking motivation is being unemployed, and having no income currently is making it hard to buy anything more than nickle and dime stuff and not feeling an immense pain in my wallet glands.

I'm working on that.

I'm fairly certain they'll still be around when you're able to come pilfer...and I'll probably have a lot more stuff available, lol.

Hang in there man, employment will happen...probably at the most inconvenient time, haha.
 
Sorta Progress?

Had a rather unproductive first half of the week - battling something of a cold, so I haven't been going outside much. I'm feeling a little better now, and (coincidentally) it has been unseasonably warm here, so I suppose now I have no excuse not to at least attempt to work on the car... by myself in my tiny garage.

What was I even doing last time? I don't remember. Maybe I should keep a journal or something - would be helpful for knowing which bolts go where when I take 6-15 day breaks from working on it. A lot of the time I have to rely on pictures I take for this thread.

Anyways, to get the new water pump on, I needed to loosen (or remove) the bracket for the power steering pump. The first hurdle for me was getting this third bolt off a flange that mounts to the cylinder head. For whatever reason, I wasn't able to fit any of my 12mm sockets in there, and a wrench didn't work because of some reinforcing ribs down inside.

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Of course, this turned out to be a non-issue, as I'm an idiot and didn't realize I could just push the p-s pump itself over to the side. Previously I thought it was already at the end of its travel, but the adjuster bolt was just a little rusty.

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Anyway, loosening that up a little gave me enough wiggle room to slide the pump in. The tricky thing here is getting the new water pump in without losing its gasket - it likes to just kinda fall out when pinched.

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That top-left bolt had to be removed later, as it's also used to sandwich the backing plate for the timing cover, which I had a hell of a time trying to fit. The water pump needed to be moved several times to get the holes to line up properly. For a bit, I was worried that I'd bought the wrong part or something because the fit was so off.

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After some frustration, I just gave it a good smack and it went into place. A lot of finagling was needed to get all the smaller screw holes to line up properly.

Then, of course, I tried to do a little too much, too fast. Put the cam gear on (not tightened all the way), and the crank sprocket(?) and tried to fit the belt - to no avail. I'm definitely doing it wrong here, and need to read up on the actual process.

Feel free to laugh at me, I've never dealt with a belt before - my last experience with timing anything was on a small block Chevy.

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I'll work on it again soon - getting to reassembly is a big deal.
 
Well done! Keep it up!

A pro tip on how to make progress; work on the car for at least 15 minutes EVERY day. Most of the the times you will end up spending more than 15 minutes in the garage. Sometimes you will probably stare at some bolts for 15 minutes or just clean the glove compartment but the important thing is to keep it up mentally by going there every day.
 
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