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the four eyed pig volvo 242

Nice shifter! Does it get epoxied or other sealer to keep it from staining?

Body work looks like a decent start. What did you do on the backside of the visible repair?

Have you used filler before? I ask 'cos it looks a little uneven spread in the pics, like it was setting up to quick when applied. Either less hardener proportionate to the epoxy, or work at laying a quick smooth thin base before adding more..

Nope, first time using any means of body filler, or body repair for that matter.

I will definitely remember to use less hardener, I was finding that it was difficult to get an even spread, it has also since the previous photo, been sanded and re applied to even out the look.
Still not perfect, definitely getting better

The shift knob is currently getting a polyurethane finish, and had been slightly changed since the previous pic.
 
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First two pictures are post mineral oil rub
Last pic is of the polyurethane varnish I am using to give it a window look to the sunken-in logo
 
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shift knob got a coat of the finish. looks a bit cloudy in photos but irl looks pretty dec

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bought some nice goodies for the upcoming +t
T cam if anyone was wondering

some pics of the lathe work to get a 4cl t5 to mate to a deeworks kit,
still have to pull the m46 to check clearances and dial in the fit of the bearing retainer to the kit and bellhousing.
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I have made a blunder, in an attempt to oxy weald the hairline cracks on the collector of the manifold I have made the cracks larger and much worse.
I am now starting to practice my stick welding and hoping real hard that that ends up working
 
I have made a blunder, in an attempt to oxy weald the hairline cracks on the collector of the manifold I have made the cracks larger and much worse.
I am now starting to practice my stick welding and hoping real hard that that ends up working

It won't work. There is a special rod for welding cast iron manifolds that doesn't require the normal preheat & very slow cooldown post weld, works with a TIG welder. All you are going to do is f**k the manifold if you try & arc weld it.
 
I have made a blunder, in an attempt to oxy weald the hairline cracks on the collector of the manifold I have made the cracks larger and much worse.
I am now starting to practice my stick welding and hoping real hard that that ends up working

There are oxy, arc, mig, and tig specific fillers for cast-iron alloys, and different alloys of cast-iron require different rods. Generally you can get by with a stainless steel filler with preheat if you're in a pinch or don't want to spend the $$ on cast-specific filler.

I generally use a 309L SS rod for manifold repairs with a solid pre and post heat as in the video above.
There are some high temp nickel brazing rods that will work with OA on cast.

For expensive or "exotic" fillers, I buy them from Amazon or ebay. Usually 1/4-1/10 the cost of the local welding shop.

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=Cast+Iro...+welding+electrode,tools,139&ref=nb_sb_noss_2
 
an unfortunate discovery has been made on the drivers side rear wheel well, a crack has revealed itself after a session of wire wheeling from what I had thought was "just surface rust" -me
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it has a couple cracks, the depth of which have not been investigated as of now.
after a week of just plain being worried about it, I had decided that I had to get it professionally looked at, which as it turns out none of the shops in my area will do as they either specialize full restorations, or not doing rust work whatsoever.
after another week, I have decided that I will take it upon myself to repair the spot in a heroic effort to make my 240 probably safe.

does anyone have suggestions as how to go about easily replacing holes in a fender liner, are there any decent plastic or adhesive rubber options just to keep water off of the inner fender metal?
 
Have you got any closeup pictures of the cracks?

One way to do it is make the crack deeper and a bit wider with the grinding disc, so it's more like a v shaped groove and then fill it with weld, other would be to cut it out completely and replacing it with a piece of sheetmetal. It all depends where and how the crack is occured.

I will be doing quite a bit of the same structural repairs on my 242 soon, so it is another thing i need to consider.

Good luck!
 
Have you got any closeup pictures of the cracks?

One way to do it is make the crack deeper and a bit wider with the grinding disc, so it's more like a v shaped groove and then fill it with weld, other would be to cut it out completely and replacing it with a piece of sheetmetal. It all depends where and how the crack is occured.

I will be doing quite a bit of the same structural repairs on my 242 soon, so it is another thing i need to consider.

Good luck!

I do in fact
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more body work on drivers side rear wheelwell
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still very much so unfinished, the reason for the primer is so I can keep driving it regularly during the Vancouver island rainy season and not have to worry about new rust patches.
 
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